designer Scott Newkirk Brooklyn apartment
photo: michael mundy

One of the best virtual “house tours” we’ve seen of late was designer Scott Newkirk’s Brooklyn, NY apartment featured on Remodelista via An Afternoon With. Newkirk’s place is beautiful, completely unfussy and full of smart, do-able ideas that make great use of limited space. He’s culled many of his treasures at flea markets, transforming them in interesting ways. Newkirk “finds beauty in the ordinary”, evidenced by dramatic curtains made from rough burlap. We love his stacks of books that double as display shelf.

Details of the apartment are well noted, so you’ll find great information about materials you can apply to your own space…

…from where to buy such dramatic swaths of burlap…

Scott Newkirk's Brooklyn apt burlap curtains
photo: michael mundy

…to walnut husks, which artist Michael Capotosto used to make a painting right on Newkirk’s wall. They can be mixed with hot water to make a natural dark dye – just what we’ve been looking for to dye a shipping pallet vertical garden safely.

Scott Newkirk Brkln apt walnut shell wall art
photo: michael mundy

Related posts: d-i-y shipping pallet vertical garden
voyeur: apartments of nyc artists + others
dieter roth’s workspace + the courage to ‘leave crap the way it is’
real-life interiors

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2 replies on “stacked-book display cases and other great ideas via scott newkirk

  1. YES: Love the expanse of fabric and Newkirk’s earthy palette, m-hmm.
    &
    NO: A friend of mine also stacks his (art) books vertically – totally maddening: when you want to look at one, you must deconstruct the tower.

  2. I hear you BUT think that it’s a reality of never-enough-room urban spaces that a stack of books might need to double as a surface…I guess it depends what’s on the surface, and if it’s a big deal to move, and if it keeps you from looking at a book.

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